Why you need a professional email address for a business

Imagine you’re looking for a plumber online. You want to find a reputable professional who you can rely on and, after scrolling through numerous websites you finally decide on the one you want to contact. It all looks perfect until you read “Email me at joesplumbing@hotmail.com

Or what if you meet somebody at a business networking meeting. You are looking to hire a PR professional, for example, and the person you are talking to ticks all the right boxes.

Then, he hands you his business card and tells you to get in touch at cassanovajohn1987@yahoo.com.

Next time you’re on the road, keep an eye out for unprofessional email addresses. You’re sure to find one!

Unprofessional email addresses ruin the credibility of a business. You wouldn’t wear a Hawaiian shirt for a meeting with your bank manager or tell the Board of Directors the suggestive nickname you earned in Ibiza.

So, with professionalism in mind, don’t let your brand make a terrible impression with an inappropriate email address.

A custom email address helps your business to be taken seriously. If you create a professional email address, you can use the same name to create a website or simply a Facebook presence.

This will have five key benefits:

Branding

The email address joe.johnson@jjplumbing.co.uk incorporates the business’s brand name; people who see your contact details can even make an educated guess about the URL of your website.

Giving out your email address becomes an indirect way of promoting a company’s web address, whereas using joesplumbers@gmail.com gives potential customers no indication of where they can find you online.

Authenticity

A professional email address creates an air of authenticity. Using plumbingspecialist147@yahoo.co.uk, on the other hand, simply does not convey trustworthiness.

Consumers look for indications that an online business is legitimate before handing over their cash or sharing a web link with their friends so, if you have a well-presented website or Facebook presence with authoritative information and an appropriate domain name, don’t let yourself down with a questionable free email address on your contact page.

Simplicity

So many people use free email services that finding a username can be difficult. This means that people often have to add a string of numbers or an extra word to their name or nickname to find an available option.

So, while clothesshop@gmail.com looks unprofessional, clothesshop1989@gmail.com is even worse!

The lack of new username options means that getting an email address with one of the popular, free email platforms now requires creative thinking and compromises.

In contrast, emails set up with your own domain can be simple and streamlined. Some options include:

  • [firstname]@domain.co.uk
  • [firstname.surname]@domain.co.uk
  • sales@domain.co.uk, support@domain.co.uk, admin@domain.co.uk etc.

Scalability

If you founded your business as a solopreneur and have grown to house a staff of ten, using custom email addresses based on your domain name is the only realistic way to manage this growth.

When you already have saira@greatdogfood.co.uk and yasmin@greatdogfood.co.uk, creating new professional email addresses when Mark and Alex join the company is no big deal.

If you use free email addresses, however, new staff or departments will cause a headache.

Creating a series of addresses like greatdogfood-saira@hotmail.com and greatdogfood-alex@yahoo.com is unwieldy and looks, frankly, ridiculous.

Ownership

If your free email address is suspended, there is very little you can do about it because the email account never truly belonged to you. Could you cope if Gmail or Hotmail cancelled your account and lost all your messages?

If, for whatever reason, your free email account is cancelled, your customers will not be able to get in touch with you and your business cards and other promotional materials will be instantly obsolete.

Avoid this catastrophe by using email addresses owned by your business and take full control of your communications.

Conclusion

Email accounts can then be easily managed on the web, using software like Thunderbird and Outlook, or on gadgets like iPhones, Android devices and Tablets.

Speak to PR PC Support & Cloud Services for the complete package :
– Custom, Personalised domain name
– Facebook Page
– Professional business email accounts

Email addresses are not something any brand should compromise on. Create a great impression and make your contact details memorable and appropriate, not embarrassing and unprofessional.

PR PC Support & Cloud Services packages

Package 1
– Domain Name (3 Years), Facebook Page, Email setup £120 one off fee
– Office 365 Business Essentials Mailboxes ( £5 per month per user)

Package 2
– Domain Name (3 Years), Facebook Page, Email setup £120 one off fee
– Office 365 Business Premium Mailboxes ( £11 per month per user)

Optional website landing page – with logo & contact details – £50

New Email Extortion Scam Bomb Threat Demands Bitcoin

 Stu Sjouwerman (https://blog.knowbe4.com/)

A new email extortion scam is making the rounds, threatening that someone has planted bombs within the recipient’s building that will be detonated unless a hefty bitcoin ransom is paid by the end of the business day.

The email was reported to KnowBe4 via a number of sources, including the (free) Phish Alert Button. It appears that the Bitcoin address was different in each message, indicating a higher level of automation than normal. This is essentially a variant of the recent sextortion strains that are doing the rounds. Here is a screenshot

This campaign was carried out by the same group of spammers responsible for the recent wave of sextortion scams, two cyber-security firms said on Friday. “Multiple IPs involved in sending these bomb threats also sent various types of sextortion email that we saw in the previous campaign,” said Jaeson Schultz of Cisco Talos.

This campaign is likely to be very disruptive, some organizations receiving will have no choice but to treat this as a credible threat and go into lockdown like banks and school districts. This is a developing story, more will undoubtedly follow.  Here is the text of one version of the extortion email:

My man carried a bomb (Hexogen) into the building where your company is located. It is constructed under my direction. It can be hidden anywhere because of its small size, it is not able to damage the supporting building structure, but in the case of its detonation you will get many victims.

My mercenary keeps the building under the control. If he notices any unusual behavior or emergency he will blow up the bomb.

I can withdraw my mercenary if you pay. You pay me 20.000 $ in Bitcoin and the bomb will not explode, but don’t try to cheat -I warrant you that I will withdraw my mercenary only after 3 confirmations in blockchain network.

Here is my Bitcoin address : 1GHKDgQX7hqTM7mMmiiUvgihGMHtvNJqTv

You have to solve problems with the transfer by the end of the workday. If you are late with the money explosive will explode.

This is just a business, if you don’t send me the money and the explosive device detonates, other commercial enterprises will transfer me more money, because this isnt a one-time action.

I wont visit this email. I check my Bitcoin wallet every 35 min and after seeing the money I will order my recruited person to get away.

If the explosive device explodes and the authorities notice this letter: We are not terrorists and dont assume any responsibility for explosions in other buildings.

I suggest you send the following to your employees. You’re welcome to copy, paste, and/or edit:

The bad guys are getting very threatening with extortion scams. They now send you an email that looks like a bomb threat and they claim there is an explosive device in the building which will detonate unless you pay bitcoin. This threat is being sent to literally millions of people, so the likelihood that it real is very small. However, we cannot take any risks and please treat this threat as follow our organization’s security policy, and do not answer or forward this email. Think Before You Click!  [OPTIONAL]  Click on the Phish Alert Button to delete it from your inbox and at the same time alert IT about this scam.

The spammers behind this campaign stopped sending bomb threats on Friday, most likely realizing that this campaign won’t yield any results, especially after the FBI, the police, and the media told everyone to ignore the threats and not pay the ransom demand.

And according to Cisco Talos, no one did. Schultz said that Talos discovered 17 Bitcoin addresses inside the bomb threat extortion emails, but none held any money. “Only two of the addresses have a positive balance, both from transactions received Dec. 13, the day the attacks were distributed,” Schultz said. “However, the amounts of each transaction were under $1, so it is evident the victims in this case declined to pay the $20,000 extortion payment price demanded by the attackers.”

Now It’s Throwing Acid…

But the spammers have not given up. Talos said that as soon as theirbomb threat campaign appeared to hit a dead end, the group switched to anotherone. “The attackers have returned to their empty threats of harming theindividual recipient,” Schultz said. “This time, they threaten tothrow acid on the victim.” A copy of an email carrying this latest threat is available below.