Google Phishing Scam : Beware new scam targeting Googlemail

A huge scam is sweeping the web and anyone with a Gmail account may be vulnerable.

 

A huge scam is sweeping the web and anyone with a Gmail account may be vulnerable. Huge numbers of people may have been compromised by the phishing scam that allows hackers to take over people’s email accounts. It’s not clear who is running the quickly spreading scam or why. But it gives people access to people’s most personal details and information, and so the damage may be massive.

The scam works by sending users an innocent looking Google Doc link, which appears to have come from someone you might know. But if it’s clicked then it will give over access to your Gmail account — and turn it into a tool for spreading the hack further.
As such, experts have advised people to only click on Google Doc links they are absolutely sure about. If you have already clicked on such a link, or may have done, inform your workplace IT staff as the account may have been compromised. The hack doesn’t only appear to be affecting Gmail accounts but a range of corporate and business ones that use Google’s email service too.

If you think you may have clicked on it, you should head to Google’s My Account page. Head to the permissions option and remove the “Google Doc” app, which appears the same as any other.
You’ll be able to tell if it is the malicious app if it has a recent authorisation time. That app has full access to a person’s Google account as well as being able to send emails that appear to be from them, making the attack especially dangerous. The email itself comes addressed to hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh@mailinator.com — which is the only way to know that the email is malicious. They otherwise look completely legitimate, including the account in the “from” field.

Facebook Hoax

If you get a Facebook message with the follwing text

Tell all contacts from your list not to accept a video called the “Sonia disowns Rahul “. It is a virus that formats your mobile. Beware it is very dangerous. They announced it today on the radio.

Do not share it as it is a hoax. It will not format your mobile and you probably won’t ever be sent the so called video

http://www.snopes.com/sonia-disowns-rahul-hoax/

Don’t fall for the re-hashed Facebook scam

A lot of people are sharing this on their Facebook status

“Deadline tomorrow !!! Everything you’ve ever posted becomes public from tomorrow. Even messages that have been deleted or the photos not allowed. It costs nothing for a simple copy and paste, better safe than sorry. Channel 13 News talked about the change in Facebook’s privacy policy. I do not give Facebook or any entities associated with Facebook permission to use my pictures, information, messages or posts, both past and future. With this statement, I give notice to Facebook it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, or take any other action against me based on this profile and/or its contents. The content of this profile is private and confidential information. The violation of privacy can be punished by law (UCC 1-308- 1 1 308-103 and the Rome Statute). NOTE: Facebook is now a public entity. All members must post a note like this. If you prefer, you can copy and paste this version. If you do not publish a statement at least once it will be tactically allowing the use of your photos, as well as the information contained in the profile status updates. DO NOT SHARE. Copy and paste.”

Don’t be fooled …its a hoax… if you are concerned, follow the guide below on how to protect your Facebook privacy:

  1. See what your profile looks like to a stranger
    From your Facebook homepage, click your name on the blue bar on the top of the page. Click the three dots next to “View Activity Log” and then select “View As…” By default you’ll be able to see what your profile looks like to members, and can click through to sections such as photos to see what they can see. You can also select a certain friend to see what your profile looks like to them.
  2. Make all your posts private
    If you find that to your horror, hundreds of statuses and photos are public, there’s a quick way to make everything visible to just your friends. Click the drop down arrow on the right hand side of the blue bar, go to Settings and then Privacy, and then select “limit past posts”. It’s a move that’s not easily undone, so you’ll be asked to confirm that you want your posts made more private.
  3. Make yourself difficult to be found on Google and with phone numbers
    Facebook accounts can be found in all sorts of ways: They can be searched for, or if someone has your email address or phone number, they can find you – even if they don’t know your name. On the “Privacy” section of Settings you can choose to be invisible to search engines by answering “no” to “Do you want search engines outside of Facebook to link to your profile?” You can also select whether friends, friends of friends or everyone can find you with your email and phone number.
  4. Adjust what apps are showing your Facebook friends
    Many of the most popular apps now connect to your Facebook profile, meaning that your activity on those apps might be posted on your Facebook profile. But to do this, the apps have to get permission, which is where you can step in. In Settings, go to the Apps section and click “Select All” to see what permissions apps have. You may want some of these to be able to post on your behalf – Instagram for example – but you may not want your dating apps to do so, for example. Click an app to adjust privacy settings.
  5. Approve tags before they appear
    When people write on your wall or tag you in a status or photo, you might not want some people to see it. Facebook allows you to review any posts with you tagged in them before they appear on your timeline, although you’d have to report a status or photo for it to disappear. To turn approval on, go to “Timeline and Tagging” in your settings and turn “Review posts friends tag you in before they appear on your timeline” on.

ARM chipmaker to be bought for £24bn by Japan’s Softbank

UK technology firm ARM Holdings is to be bought by Japan’s Softbank for £24bn ($32bn) it confirmed today. The board of ARM is expected to recommend shareholders accept the offer – which is around a 43% premium on its closing market value of £16.8bn on Friday. The Cambridge-based firm designs microchips used in most smartphones, including Apple’s and Samsung’s.
ARM, which was founded in 1990, employs more than 3,000 people.

ARM said it would keep its headquarters in Cambridge and that it would at least double the number of its staff over the next five years. The deal will be funded by Softbank’s own cash reserves and a long term loan from Japan’s Mizuho Bank. Softbank is one of the world’s biggest technology companies and is run by its founder, Japanese entrepreneur Masayoshi Son. It has previously acquired Vodafone’s Japanese operations and the US telecoms company Sprint. The $20bn deal was the biggest foreign acquisition by a Japanese firm at the time.
Softbank intends to preserve the UK tech firm’s organisation, including its existing senior management structure and partnership-based business model, ARM said.

ARM is arguably the most precious jewel in the crown of British technology. Softbank considers ARM well placed to exploit the “internet of things” – the embedding of microchips in whole new categories of household and business devices. But the proposed takeover poses a dilemma for the new government. Along with high executive pay, Prime Minister Theresa May has put foreign takeovers on her radar of business dealings that may be bad for the national interest. However, the government will be keen to show that the recent Brexit vote has not deterred foreign investment. Barring government intervention, the final decision will be made by shareholders.

Masayoshi Son, chairman and chief executive of Softbank, said: “This is one of the most important acquisitions we have ever made, and I expect ARM to be a key pillar of SoftBank’s growth strategy going forward, “We have long admired ARM as a world renowned and highly respected technology company that is by some distance the market leader in its field.”
Mr Son added: “ARM will be an excellent strategic fit with the Softbank group as we invest to capture the very significant opportunities provided by the internet of things”
Chancellor Phillip Hammond reacted to the news of the takeover by saying it showed UK companies had lost none of their “allure to international investors”. “Britain is open for business – and open to foreign investment. Softbank’s decision confirms that Britain remains one of the most attractive destinations globally for investors to create jobs and wealth. “And as ARM’s founders will testify, this is the greatest place in the world to start and grow a technology business,” he added.

Publiched here : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-36822806

Sonos Tips: Custom Alarms

Those of you with SONOS system may find this useful – received this email from SONOS ( and if you don’t have one, I strongly recommend you invest! 🙂 )

sonos

Sure, music’s a great way to greet each morning, but there’s a whole day’s worth of things you can do with Sonos Alarms.

  1. Like rise and shine to different songs or playlists on different days. (Funk Fridays, anyone?)
  2. Set up TuneIn radio to deliver your favourite news, weather or local radio shows while you make your morning coffee.
  3. Entertain the dog while you’re away.
  4. Have Beyoncé greet you as you arrive home from work.
  5. Send the kids off to bed with their favourite song.
  6. Wake your better half on their birthday with that song they love.

To set a SONOS alarm

On your Sonos app, tap the Menu, upper left

1

Scroll to Alarms

2

Select ‘new Alarm’

3

Set the Time, Room, Music, Frequency and Volume

4

Tap Done

5

 

Microsoft to buy LinkedIn

Microsoft has acquired LinkedIn for $26.2 billion. The software giant plans to integrate the career-oriented social network into many of its apps and services, including Office, Skype and Cortana. You’d get the details of the person you’re meeting for a business deal, for example, or get help from an expert when you’re working on an Office 365 project. Microsoft is vowing to maintain LinkedIn’s overall independence, including the role of CEO Jeff Weiner, and hopes to close the deal sometime in 2016.

According to Microsoft’s Satya Nadella, LinkedIn is a perfect fit. You need a “connected professional world” to get things done, he says, whether it’s getting help with a spreadsheet or fleshing out details in a customer relations tool like Microsoft’s Dynamics. And while Microsoft is purposefully keeping itself at arm’s length, Nadella sees the potential for revenue through subscriptions and (like it or not) targeted ads.

Suffice it to say that this is a huge move for Microsoft. It’s entering the social networking world in a big way — while LinkedIn isn’t direct competition for Facebook or Twitter, its 433 million members are nothing to sneeze at. The acquisition is also proof positive that Microsoft under Nadella is reducing its dependence on Windows and putting more of an emphasis on cloud services. This is as much about acknowledging a changing computing landscape, where Windows doesn’t necessarily dominate, as it is a bid to become a crucial service provider.

Phishing email that knows your address

Something you need to be aware of, posted on the BBC ( http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-35977227 )

emailscam

A new type of phishing email that includes the recipient’s home address has been received by thousands of people, the BBC has learned.
Members of the BBC Radio 4’s You and Yours team were among those who received the scam emails, claiming they owed hundreds of pounds to UK firms.
The firms involved have been inundated with phone calls from worried members of the public.
One security expert warned clicking on the link would install malware. You and Yours reporter Shari Vahl was one of the first on the team to receive an email. “The email has good spelling and grammar and my exact home address…when I say exact I mean, not the way my address is written by those autofill sections on web pages, but the way I write my address. “My tummy did a bit of a somersault when I read that, because I wondered who on earth I could owe £800 to and what was about to land on my doormat.” She quickly realised it was a scam and did not click on the link. “Then, a couple of minutes later, You and Yours producer Jon Douglas piped up as he’d received one and then another colleague said he’d received one too, but to his home email address,” she added.
The You and Yours team decided to contact the companies that were listed in the emails as being owed money.
A spokesman for British Millerain Co Ltd, a waxed cotton fabric manufacturer, told the programme that the firm “had more than 150 calls from people who don’t owe us money”.

And a spokeswoman for Manchester shelving firm Greenoaks said: “My colleague took a call from an elderly gentleman and he was very distressed because his wife had had one of these emails.”

Dr Steven Murdoch, principal research fellow at the department of computer science at University College London, told You and Yours: “Most likely it was a retailer or other internet site that had been hacked into and the database stolen, it then could have been sold or passed through several different people and then eventually it got to the person who sent out these emails.” He said that the email bore the hallmark of previous phishing attempts from gangs in Eastern Europe and Russia. He said that clicking on the link would install malware such as Cryptolocker, which is a form of ransomware that will encrypt files on Windows-based computers and then demand a fee to unlock them.
Anyone receiving such an email is advised to delete it and report it to the national fraud and cybercrime reporting centre Action Fraud.