Why you need a professional email address for a business

Imagine you’re looking for a plumber online. You want to find a reputable professional who you can rely on and, after scrolling through numerous websites you finally decide on the one you want to contact. It all looks perfect until you read “Email me at joesplumbing@hotmail.com

Or what if you meet somebody at a business networking meeting. You are looking to hire a PR professional, for example, and the person you are talking to ticks all the right boxes.

Then, he hands you his business card and tells you to get in touch at cassanovajohn1987@yahoo.com.

Next time you’re on the road, keep an eye out for unprofessional email addresses. You’re sure to find one!

Unprofessional email addresses ruin the credibility of a business. You wouldn’t wear a Hawaiian shirt for a meeting with your bank manager or tell the Board of Directors the suggestive nickname you earned in Ibiza.

So, with professionalism in mind, don’t let your brand make a terrible impression with an inappropriate email address.

A custom email address helps your business to be taken seriously. If you create a professional email address, you can use the same name to create a website or simply a Facebook presence.

This will have five key benefits:

Branding

The email address joe.johnson@jjplumbing.co.uk incorporates the business’s brand name; people who see your contact details can even make an educated guess about the URL of your website.

Giving out your email address becomes an indirect way of promoting a company’s web address, whereas using joesplumbers@gmail.com gives potential customers no indication of where they can find you online.

Authenticity

A professional email address creates an air of authenticity. Using plumbingspecialist147@yahoo.co.uk, on the other hand, simply does not convey trustworthiness.

Consumers look for indications that an online business is legitimate before handing over their cash or sharing a web link with their friends so, if you have a well-presented website or Facebook presence with authoritative information and an appropriate domain name, don’t let yourself down with a questionable free email address on your contact page.

Simplicity

So many people use free email services that finding a username can be difficult. This means that people often have to add a string of numbers or an extra word to their name or nickname to find an available option.

So, while clothesshop@gmail.com looks unprofessional, clothesshop1989@gmail.com is even worse!

The lack of new username options means that getting an email address with one of the popular, free email platforms now requires creative thinking and compromises.

In contrast, emails set up with your own domain can be simple and streamlined. Some options include:

  • [firstname]@domain.co.uk
  • [firstname.surname]@domain.co.uk
  • sales@domain.co.uk, support@domain.co.uk, admin@domain.co.uk etc.

Scalability

If you founded your business as a solopreneur and have grown to house a staff of ten, using custom email addresses based on your domain name is the only realistic way to manage this growth.

When you already have saira@greatdogfood.co.uk and yasmin@greatdogfood.co.uk, creating new professional email addresses when Mark and Alex join the company is no big deal.

If you use free email addresses, however, new staff or departments will cause a headache.

Creating a series of addresses like greatdogfood-saira@hotmail.com and greatdogfood-alex@yahoo.com is unwieldy and looks, frankly, ridiculous.

Ownership

If your free email address is suspended, there is very little you can do about it because the email account never truly belonged to you. Could you cope if Gmail or Hotmail cancelled your account and lost all your messages?

If, for whatever reason, your free email account is cancelled, your customers will not be able to get in touch with you and your business cards and other promotional materials will be instantly obsolete.

Avoid this catastrophe by using email addresses owned by your business and take full control of your communications.

Conclusion

Email accounts can then be easily managed on the web, using software like Thunderbird and Outlook, or on gadgets like iPhones, Android devices and Tablets.

Speak to PR PC Support & Cloud Services for the complete package :
– Custom, Personalised domain name
– Facebook Page
– Professional business email accounts

Email addresses are not something any brand should compromise on. Create a great impression and make your contact details memorable and appropriate, not embarrassing and unprofessional.

PR PC Support & Cloud Services packages

Package 1
– Domain Name (3 Years), Facebook Page, Email setup £120 one off fee
– Office 365 Business Essentials Mailboxes ( £5 per month per user)

Package 2
– Domain Name (3 Years), Facebook Page, Email setup £120 one off fee
– Office 365 Business Premium Mailboxes ( £11 per month per user)

Optional website landing page – with logo & contact details – £50

Facebook Hoax

If you get a Facebook message with the follwing text

Tell all contacts from your list not to accept a video called the “Sonia disowns Rahul “. It is a virus that formats your mobile. Beware it is very dangerous. They announced it today on the radio.

Do not share it as it is a hoax. It will not format your mobile and you probably won’t ever be sent the so called video

http://www.snopes.com/sonia-disowns-rahul-hoax/

Don’t fall for the re-hashed Facebook scam

A lot of people are sharing this on their Facebook status

“Deadline tomorrow !!! Everything you’ve ever posted becomes public from tomorrow. Even messages that have been deleted or the photos not allowed. It costs nothing for a simple copy and paste, better safe than sorry. Channel 13 News talked about the change in Facebook’s privacy policy. I do not give Facebook or any entities associated with Facebook permission to use my pictures, information, messages or posts, both past and future. With this statement, I give notice to Facebook it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, or take any other action against me based on this profile and/or its contents. The content of this profile is private and confidential information. The violation of privacy can be punished by law (UCC 1-308- 1 1 308-103 and the Rome Statute). NOTE: Facebook is now a public entity. All members must post a note like this. If you prefer, you can copy and paste this version. If you do not publish a statement at least once it will be tactically allowing the use of your photos, as well as the information contained in the profile status updates. DO NOT SHARE. Copy and paste.”

Don’t be fooled …its a hoax… if you are concerned, follow the guide below on how to protect your Facebook privacy:

  1. See what your profile looks like to a stranger
    From your Facebook homepage, click your name on the blue bar on the top of the page. Click the three dots next to “View Activity Log” and then select “View As…” By default you’ll be able to see what your profile looks like to members, and can click through to sections such as photos to see what they can see. You can also select a certain friend to see what your profile looks like to them.
  2. Make all your posts private
    If you find that to your horror, hundreds of statuses and photos are public, there’s a quick way to make everything visible to just your friends. Click the drop down arrow on the right hand side of the blue bar, go to Settings and then Privacy, and then select “limit past posts”. It’s a move that’s not easily undone, so you’ll be asked to confirm that you want your posts made more private.
  3. Make yourself difficult to be found on Google and with phone numbers
    Facebook accounts can be found in all sorts of ways: They can be searched for, or if someone has your email address or phone number, they can find you – even if they don’t know your name. On the “Privacy” section of Settings you can choose to be invisible to search engines by answering “no” to “Do you want search engines outside of Facebook to link to your profile?” You can also select whether friends, friends of friends or everyone can find you with your email and phone number.
  4. Adjust what apps are showing your Facebook friends
    Many of the most popular apps now connect to your Facebook profile, meaning that your activity on those apps might be posted on your Facebook profile. But to do this, the apps have to get permission, which is where you can step in. In Settings, go to the Apps section and click “Select All” to see what permissions apps have. You may want some of these to be able to post on your behalf – Instagram for example – but you may not want your dating apps to do so, for example. Click an app to adjust privacy settings.
  5. Approve tags before they appear
    When people write on your wall or tag you in a status or photo, you might not want some people to see it. Facebook allows you to review any posts with you tagged in them before they appear on your timeline, although you’d have to report a status or photo for it to disappear. To turn approval on, go to “Timeline and Tagging” in your settings and turn “Review posts friends tag you in before they appear on your timeline” on.

Facebook to alert you of impersonation accounts

Apparently Facebook is testing a ‘troll detection’ engine that will scan its billions of users for accounts which appear to be impersonating others, and flag up imitations. According to Mashable it has been in development since November but is now live for 75 percent of the world.

Antigone Davis, the social network’s head of global safety, said impersonation alerts were intended to minimise the harassment of women on the platform. “It’s a real point of concern for some women in certain regions of the world where it [impersonation] may have certain cultural or social ramifications,” Davis said.

When the new feature detects a user with the same name and profile picture as another, the new tool will send an alert to the suspected target. Mashable reports that the alert will ask the person to confirm the impersonation by using personal information. The process is automated but profiles that are flagged as fake will be reviewed by Facebook staffers.

Impersonation of another user is outlawed because it falls under the company’s controversial ‘real names’ policy. Since its launch the company has insisted that users provide their real names, rather than a pseudonym or other names a person may use to ensure they are not easily found on the site. “We require people to provide the name they use in real life; that way, you always know who you’re connecting with,” Facebook’s policy page on the issue says.

However, after a coalition of human rights and privacy groups complained that the name policy “exposes its users to danger, disrespects the identities of its users, and curtails free speech,” Facebook introduced new tools to make verification easier. In December Mark Zuckerbrerg’s company started testing a tool, in the US, that allows those required to prove their identity to say if they have a “special circumstance”.

The UK is also moving to make it easier for authorities to prosecute trolls who use fake profiles online. The move from the Crown Prosecution Service aims to clampdown on those that post “damaging or embarrassing” material.

As well as the impersonation feature Facebook is also reportedly testing new ways for people to report nonconsensual intimate images — commonly referred to as revenge porn — that are posted to the site.

Facebook is apparently testing a new way of reporting nudity; when someone reports an inappropriate photo they will have the ability to identify themselves as the person in the photo. Facebook will then review the images as standard, but Mashable reports that when this happens it will provide links to support groups and potential legal options.

Recently WIRED reported on the cases of several users who had sensitive photos posted to Facebook. The issue, which is a growing one across all social media platforms, was described by legal experts as having “no silver bullet”.

Mary Anne Franks, Law professor, University of Miami School of Law, said that as a society we need to change laws, technology and culture.

This article was published on www.wired.comhttp://bit.ly/1MlPnCR )

Facebook Dislike button is a fake – BEWARE

 

Facebook users who have clicked on the link claiming to “Enable Dislike Button” , could have experienced problems. Messages claiming to offer the opposite to a like button have been appearing on many Facebook users’ walls.

Like the many scams which have come before it, the scammers have managed to duck under the Facebook security wire and replace the standard “Share” option with a link called “Enable Dislike Button”. Despite the fact that the “Enable Dislike Button” link does not appear in the main part of the message, but lower down alongside “Link” and “Comment”, it is still likely to fool some users into believing that it is genuine.

Clicking on the link, however, not only forwards the fake message to all of your Facebook friends by posting it to your profile, but also run obscured Javascript on your computer.

There is no official dislike button provided by Facebook and there isn’t ever likely to be. But it remains something that many Facebook users would like, and so scammers have often used the offer of a “Dislike button” as bait for the unaware.

Facebook : sharing home address & phone number with developers

Do you publish your home address online? Facebook has caused no small amount of concern by quietly opening the address and phone number fields to developers. A post on Saturday  by Jeff Bowen in Facebook’s developer support team explained that users’ addresses and mobile phone numbers are being made available on the development platform through a number of APIs.

Users would have to accept a new app and allow it access to personal information. Contact details of friends would not be accessible unless they too accepted the app.

But the primary concern, as neatly summarised by Graham Cluley on the Sophos blog, is that rogue app developers could efficiently harvest this very valuable information by developing apps that scrape this contact information and use it for spam or cold-calling.

“Facebook is already plagued by rogue applications that post spam links to users’ walls, and point users to survey scams that earn them commission – and even sometimes trick users into handing over their cellphone numbers to sign them up for a premium rate service,” he wrote last night. “You have to ask yourself – is Facebook putting the safety of its 500+ million users as a top priority with this move?”
 

appi

Facebook’s latest API allows developers access to users’ address and mobile number.

This is clearly the downside of Facebook’s open apps policy, though it’s extremely unlikely Facebook would reverse that and head down the Apple road of approving apps – which has a whole set of different problems. Cluley suggests developers should only be granted access to this information if it proven to be a valid use, or that users should be asked to approve sharing this data.

Latest :
Facebook reminds us that there’s a difference between rogue applications and apps with a genuine reason for accessing your address or phone number. A spokesperson gave the example of an airline’s e-commerce app that could be more useful if it could notify users about last minute flight changes.
“On Facebook you have absolute control over what information you share, who you share it with and when you want to remove it. Developers can now request permission to access a person’s address and mobile phone number to make applications built on Facebook more useful and efficient. You need to explicitly choose to share your data before any app or website can access it and no private information is shared without your permission. As an additional step for this new feature, you’re not able to share your friends’ address or mobile information

To change your shared settings , goto your Account  | Privacy Settings , choose ‘customise settings’ and amend the tab accordingly

privacy

Free iPhone’s on Facebook…. Don’t be fooled.

     

Users on Facebook are being swamped with messages claiming that they have received free iPhones. These messages invite others to participate in a scheme to receive a free iPhone as well. What users don’t realise is that the messages are being sent by a number of applications that request access to their profiles & walls.
A free iPhone – ‘Yes Please’ .. it’s no great surprise that people want to take advantage of an unbelievable offer to a free iPhone

Well , don’t be fooled – this is what happens when you click the link….

Firstly , the application home page is displayed with the message “Click here for your FREE iPhone4”

 


Like any other application on Facebook , it requests permission to access your personal information and access to posting on your wall. You’re going to allow it for a free phone worth around £600 right?

Once the application has been given the permission to access, it congratulates you and request you take a survey to complete your transaction. The survey directs you to a website that also earns money for the spammers/hackers on a commission basis.


Are you ever going to see your shiny new iPhone4 ? Nope.. not a chance. All that will now happen is that your Facebook wall will fill up with messages telling everyone you have a free iPhone 4 and encouraging them to do likewise.

If you are one of the (un)lucky ones to register for a free iPhone4, goto your Application Security settings and remove the any of the applications listed below, and remember, you don’t get anything for nothing!:

  • ‘iSocial Network.’
  • ‘Safari for iPhone application’
  • ‘iWant’
  • ‘Mobile Networking’

Another Facebook Clickjacking attack…

If you see : OMG… This Guy Takes Revenge on His Ex-Girlfriend TOO FAR! Check out the PICTURES!

Don’t follow the link , and if you do – don’t click on any coloured boxes ! – it’s a new clickjacking attack on the loose. It’s affecting thousands of users and spreading like wildfire through their status updates.

The scam comes in the form of a status update containing a link with the words: “OMG This GUY Went A Little To Far WITH His Revenge On His EX Girlfriend.”

As with all similar scams, after users click on the link, they’re asked to go through a fake captcha-style mechanism to see any content.

The fake captcha asks you to click on two colored boxes, which are actually linked to Facebook’s Share and “Like” buttons, effectively causing users to “Like” the page, as well as post the aforementioned status update to their own walls.

It doesn’t appear that this clickjacking attack spreads malware, but it’s a clear case of spam, and thus annoying to most users. If you or someone you know fell for the trick, you are advised to remove the status update and the related links from your “Likes” section on your Facebook profile page.

Facebook Scams : Watch out for them

 Things like “Shocking hidden message on Coca-Cola logo, and other Facebook scams” and “Girl captured DEAD on Google Street View Captured by Google” trick people into adding rogue applications to their accounts.

These can then be usedto spread more of their scams. There’s an account which suddenly started advertising a scam page, even though the user hadn’t logged in for days. In other words, they hadn’t been socially engineered or clickjacked into posting this message.

Other versions of similar scams are “SHOCKING SATANIC Message In The Coca Cola Logo” If you see any of your Facebook friends posting these messages, and you click on the link you’ll be walking into a trap yourself and could soon be spreading the dodgy links to your online friends as well. And it’s not just hidden messages in Coca-Cola logos. The same Facebook users are being used to spreading messages about: Girl captured DEAD on Google Street View Captured by Google and 99 facts Guys wish Girls knew! <3 These are the 99 things all Girls MUST know about guys. These facts are 100% true and absolutely SHOCKING!!! Until more users learn to be suspicious of liking pages like this, and keep a closer eye on what installs itself on their Facebook page, these scams are likely to continue. If you’ve been hit by such an attack – check that your profile no longer “like”s any of these pages, and remove the right of suspicious applications to access your account. It also may be time to choose another password – make sure it’s a strong one.

Facebook users urged not to spread ‘Girl who killed herself’ computer virus warnings

Facebook users spread online suicide hoax
Users urged not to spread ‘Girl who killed herself’ computer virus warnings
Written by Dinah Greek, Computeractive
06 Aug 2010

A hoax alert about a virus is rapidly spreading across Facebook according to security company Sophos. Sophos said a large number of people, hoping to help other users of the social-networking site, are forwarding the warning that an alert about a girl who killed herself over something her father wrote on her wall is infected with malware.Sophos said although there is no malware involved, it is alarming people. The situation is complicated further by cybercriminals creating Facebook pages that pretend to host pictures of the non-existent ‘girl’. These pages are more dangerous and designed to generate money by sending unsuspecting users to online surveys.
Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos said: “Facebook users should always check their facts with a reputable source before sharing a virus warning with their online friends. “Scares like this can cause users to panic unnecessarily, and may mean that the public takes genuine virus outbreaks less seriously.”

Cluley has provided more information about the hoax on his blog. The hoax started with rumours on the internet in 2008 that a girl had killed herself. Cluley includes images of the message and pages linked to the hoax. The blog also gives some interesting background to the rumours of a girl’s online suicide.

Sophos has also set up a Facebook group, which warns of emerging threats on Facebook.The text of the current hoax reads as follows:

“WARNING: THERE IS A VIRUS GOING AROUND AGAIN, IF YOU SEE A GIRL WHO KILLED HERSELF OVER SOMETHING HER FATHER WROTE ON HER WALL DO NOT OPEN IT, IT IS A VIRUS AND IT WILL NOT ALLOW YOU TO DELETE IT, PLEASE PASS THIS ON BEFORE SOMEONE OPENS IT. (IT IS A SELF REPLICATING TROJAN)”