Momo challenge: The anatomy of a hoax

Momo image

Following a flurry of newspaper scare stories, some schools have warned parents about the “momo challenge” – but fact-checkers say it is a hoax.

The character, shown with bulging eyes, supposedly appears on WhatsApp and sets children dangerous “challenges” such as harming themselves.

But charities say there have been no reports of anybody receiving messages or harming themselves as a result.

They warn that media coverage has amplified a false scare story.

“News coverage of the momo challenge is prompting schools or the police to warn about the supposed risks posed by the momo challenge, which has in turn produced more news stories warning about the challenge,” said the Guardian media editor Jim Waterson.

What is ‘momo’?

Earlier this week, versions of the momo story went viral on social media. They attracted hundreds of thousands of shares and resulted in newspaper articles reporting the tale.

According to the false story, children are contacted on WhatsApp by an account claiming to be momo. They are supposedly encouraged to save the character as a contact and then asked to carry out challenges as well as being told not to tell other members of their family.

The UK Safer Internet Centre told the Guardian that it was “fake news”.

Several newspaper articles claim the momo challenge had been “linked” to the deaths of 130 teenagers in Russia. The reports have not been corroborated by the relevant authorities.

The image of momo is actually a photo of a sculpture by Japanese special-effects company Link Factory. According to pop-culture website Know Your Meme, it first gained attention in 2016.

‘Urban legend’

Fact-checking website Snopes warned that although the momo challenge was a hoax, the reports and warnings could still cause distress to children.

“The subject has generated rumours that in themselves can be cause for concern among children,” wrote David Mikkelson on the site.

Police in the UK have not reported any instances of children harming themselves due to the momo meme.

The charity Samaritans said it was “not aware of any verified evidence in this country or beyond” linking the momo meme to self-harm.

The NSPCC told the Guardian it had received more calls from newspapers than from concerned parents.

What should parents do?

Police have suggested that rather than focusing on the specific momo meme, parents could use the opportunity to educate children about internet safety, as well as having an open conversation about what children are accessing.

“This is merely a current, attention-grabbing example of the minefield that is online communication for kids,” wrote the Police Service of Northern Ireland, in a Facebook post.

Broadcaster Andy Robertson, who creates videos online as Geek Dad, said in a podcast that parents should not “share warnings that perpetuate and mythologise the story”.

“A better focus is good positive advice for children, setting up technology appropriately and taking an interest in their online interactions,” he said.

To avoid causing unnecessary alarm, parents should also be careful about sharing news articles with other adults that perpetuate the myth.

Is the Momo Challenge real, or an online hoax? Fact Check

BY CRAIG CHARLES ON FEBRUARY 25, 2019
https://www.thatsnonsense.com

A number of messages and warnings across the Internet describe an apparent phenomenon called the “Momo Challenge”. Many such warnings claim it is a game where children are tricked into performing increasingly violent acts including self-harm, sometimes even culminating in suicide.

Many such warnings claim the “game” is spreading on social media apps including Facebook and WhatsApp. The game is usually illustrated by a wide eyed, dark haired woman with creepy facial features.

An example is below.

FUMING IS NOT THE WORD, PASS THIS ON
So apparently there is a new thing called “the Momo challange” where this head thing is telling kids on YouTube to do dangerous stupid stuff. It starts with it coming out of an egg then develops in to hide and seek then moves on to more “fun stuff like” , turn the oven on, take pills, how to stab someone etc 😡
Your children will tell you this isn’t true as it threatens them not to say anything orels bad thing’s will happen to family members.
Apparently its leaked on to kids YouTube and comes on half way through a video to avoid being caught by adults and scares your kids in to saying nothing but doing dangerous stuff.
This has to be one of the most horrendous things iv ever seen. The face of it is a joke but the concept is horrendous.
Would hate for this to happen to any of my friend’s and family.
Until YouTube can 100% guarantee this is not a thing, there will be no more YouTube in this house.

Naturally the question many are asking – especially concerned parents – is whether the Momo Challenge is real, and should parents be alarmed?

The reality is that the Momo Challenge could be considered a number of different things, and whether it is real or something to be worried about largely depends on what you consider it to actually be in the first place.

“Momo” herself (or itself) isn’t real. It’s Internet folklore, rising up from the same murky corners of the Internet as other contemporary and passing crazes such as “Slenderman” and the very similar “Blue Whale”. The grotesque figure illustrating Momo is a sculpture, created by a Japanese special effects outfit called Link Factory. The figure is called “Mother Bird”, not “Momo”, and it’s got nothing to do with any sort of online challenge.

Additionally, there is no evidence that “Momo” can magically “hack” your phone, force her image to appear on your device or do any other sort of digital trickery, as claimed by many reports. There are no reports of “Momo” (or anyone purporting to be “Momo”) creeping into people’s rooms, or committing acts of murder for those that do not obey the “challenge”.

And there is no specific “challenge” either. There is no universal set list of tasks that those who engage in the “challenge” are told to do.

In this sense at least, Momo isn’t real. It isn’t a person, a monster, or any kind of individual hell bent on luring children or teenagers into committing acts of violence. There is no “Momo”, other than what we – and the Internet – make Momo out to be.

Taking a more pragmatic approach, while Momo isn’t real in the above sense, the Momo Challenge is a real phenomenon, perhaps most accurately described as somewhere between a viral prank, a media-fuelled alarmist craze and a potential form of cyber-bullying that should indeed be a genuine concern for parents.

It’s 90% Prank

If you come across Momo’s image, or references to her, on the Internet, it’s likely to be the prank side you’re seeing. Reports are commonplace that Momo has been “spotted” in Facebook groups, YouTube videos, in user-generated games such as Minecraft and Roblox as well as other corners of cyberspace.

But it’s unlikely that some obscure, ethereal being has infiltrated that part of the Internet looking for its next would-be victims. What you’re seeing is what the Internet does best. The proliferation of a prank. Keeping a craze alive. Scaring children, and needlessly alarming parents. For example, one thing we persistently notice after debunking viral “hacker” warnings on social media is that in the direct aftermath of the viral hoax, we see a surge of new social media accounts appear using the same name as the alleged hacker. The new accounts are not hackers, of course. Rather just pranksters cashing in on the popularity of the hoax.

Media fuelled craze

When it comes to clickbait, headlines don’t get better when discussing panic-inducing Internet challenges that have been ambiguously “linked” to teenage suicides. It’s the sort of headline that attracts clicks like a flame attracts moths. Which is why you’ll find no shortage of media outlets breathlessly warning parents to keep their children safe from Momo.

But in 2018, an Indian fact-check website investigated several cases of suicides in India and Argentina where local media had claimed the Momo Challenge was involved. In every case, police had either denied that the Momo Challenge played any part in the deaths and the link was erroneous, or that other more overriding factors (low school grades, depression, sexual abuse) had played a more significant role.

A form of cyber-bullying

While media are often quick to report on vague “links” between suicides and Internet crazes, phenomena like the Momo Challenge can serve a real purpose in that they can demonstrate the inherent dangers of allowing children and young teens to use the Internet unsupervised.

Whether it’s the dangers of being exposed to mature content, the dangers associated with connecting with strangers or the danger of cyber-bullying, the Momo Challenge serves as a timely reminder that the Internet can be a dangerous place for both young and vulnerable minds.

Protecting your children as they use the Internet is paramount. This includes supervising what they see, blocking or preventing access to platforms that contain adult content, educating children on popular Internet threats, teaching them not to give away their personal information and perhaps most importantly encouraging an open dialogue where parents and children can be honest about what they encounter when using the Internet.

It is this approach that will best protect kids when using the Internet, and that encompasses passing crazes like Momo, and whatever her successor will be.

An opportunity for scammers?

Scammers and cyber-crooks will always looking for ways to exploit viral trends, and the Momo Challenge isn’t likely to be any different. Crooks may use search trends (people looking for information concerning Momo) to lure visitors to booby trapped websites, or may use the guise of Momo to trick victims into handing over sensitive information that may result in someone falling for a cyber scam such as identity theft.

New Phishing Email – Don’t get caught

There is a new phishing email doing the rounds claiming your incoming emails are on hold and to click one of the actions listed in the email. ( see below )

There are a number of clues to prove its spam.

Firstly the from address on service@vienna.taskwunder.com – not any Office 365 admin email address I’ve ever heard of! 🙂

Secondly – hover (don’t click) the links – they link to www.nlsandton.me – again not any email provider anyone’s ever heard of.

If you get this mail – simply delete it! 🙂

Lloyds Bank fake email “FW: Incoming BACs Documents”

Just received the email below – proporting to be from Lloyds Bank – looks genuine enough but clearly it is just another phishing email looking to grab some details off you or drop some malware or Virus on your PC. If you receive this email – delete it. Do not click on the PDF link in the email

If you have already done so – contact me and I can clean your PC for you. If you don’t have a decent anti-virus – I can help you there too as I resell BitDefender GravityZone – one of the best on the market.

Look out for Office 365 Phishing email

I received this email this morning (below) which looks genuine enough at the first glance – however – hover over the ‘rectify issue’ button and you get taken off to some bizarre phishing site were you to click the link – be aware and don’t fall for these emails – if in doubt ask somebody in the know or simply hover over the button to display the destination ( this one went to http://fatebegins.com/localization/customize/index.php – clearly not a Microsoft site!

Facebook Hoax

If you get a Facebook message with the follwing text

Tell all contacts from your list not to accept a video called the “Sonia disowns Rahul “. It is a virus that formats your mobile. Beware it is very dangerous. They announced it today on the radio.

Do not share it as it is a hoax. It will not format your mobile and you probably won’t ever be sent the so called video

http://www.snopes.com/sonia-disowns-rahul-hoax/